Symbiosis

Συμβίωσις

Symbiosis describes the close and often obligate relationship between organisms of different species. This biological phenomenon lends its name and serves as core concept for this interdisciplinary art performance.

The sound is provided by a computer based system, involving eight separate modules generating sound through synthesis and live sample manipulation. Certain modulations are taking place within the audio system, resulting in timbral, harmonic, and melodic variations in the generated sounds. These modulations are controlled by a pair of motion sensors, attached onto an artist of different principle. That could be a dancer, a live drawing artist, an instrumentalist, and virtually any art form involving motion that can be inspired and directed by music.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

For the performance, the motion sensors are attached on the contrasting artist’s arms, thusly making it possible for the audio system to perform modulations by deciphering the artist’s motions into MIDI data. In turn, the musician assumes the role of conductor for the virtual ensemble, controlling the arrangement and dynamics of each sound module.

The resulting performance presents a feedback loop between the art disciplines and their respective performers. Rather than being a parallel demonstration of two separate live art forms, it is necessary for the two performers to closely collaborate in order to create the project’s end result; the contrasting art would have no direction without the musician’s arrangement, and the sound would be inanimate and lifeless without the artist’s motions.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The three performances bellow were conducted with different drawing artists, and serve as example on how the same system can produce rather individual performances due to each artist’s style of motion whilst drawing. Particularly the second performance with Alex Alexandrou, presents a comprehensive picture of how the system works, and allows the viewer to observe the way actions by either participant affect the emmited sound.